67th Florida State
Square & Round Dance Convention

67th FLORIDA STATE SQUARE & ROUND DANCE CONVENTION – “Lighting the Way to Friendship & Fun in 2021”
February 19-20, 2021  
www.FloridaSquareDance.com

 

LIGHTHOUSE #2
JUPITER INLET AT JUPITER BEACH

 
The name “Jupiter” is quite old.  It predates the arrival of the Europeans.   Native Americans called the area Jobe but some English cartographers decided that it looked like Jove, the main god of the pagan Roman pantheon and renamed it Jove which eventually got translated into Jupiter.
 
The original lighthouse was to have been built 2 miles north of Fort Jupiter in the early 1830’s to be used as an aid for coastal navigation and to bring supplies to the Fort, however the project was abandoned because of the Second Seminole War.  Congress, finally in 1853, authorized the building of a new lighthouse and in 1854 the new (and present) site was selected.   But construction was not easy.  It had been slowed by shifting sands and a Third Seminole War and then it became non-operational for a period of time.  Rebel partisans disabled the lens so that the light could not function and it did not for over a year.  As time passed the lens was restored and the Lighthouse was finally relighted in July 1860 on the eve of the Civil War.
 
During the war a Captain James Armour helped guide the Union soldiers who found and retrieved the missing lens and put the light back into service.  And he served the next 42 years as the lighthouse keeper.  Amour also helped the Union Navy capture Confederate blockade runners heading from Jupiter and the Indian River Inlet to Nassau.
 
Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse is 108 feet tall with a focal plane of 146 feet – focal plane is how far the light is visible out in the ocean.  The Coast Guard indicates the height from “mean high tide to the focal plane” is 146 feet.  Thanks to the lighthouses elevation it may be seen about 20 miles or more at sea by low riding boats.  Aircraft and taller boats will see it much sooner.  The elevation is thanks to the Native Americans who had created a mound of shells on which the Lighthouse stands. 
 
More interesting facts about the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse can be found in the book “Florida’s Fabulous Lighthouses” where I found the excerpts above.  The book can be purchased from Carol Douget, Convention Chairman.  Contact her at
cldcpa@yahoo.com.

Even though there is the scare of the VIRUS going around, you should still be thinking of getting your ribbon(s) for this convention early, before May 31, 2020, while they are still $35.00 for the weekend.  Let Carol Douget or Linda Reid, registration chairman, (
reid20@bellsouth.net) know if you or any of your clubs would like registration forms.

 

Judy Anderson

Publicity

67th FLORIDA STATE SQUARE & ROUND DANCE CONVENTION – “Lighting the Way to Friendship & Fun in 2021”
February 19-20, 2021  
www.FloridaSquareDance.com

 

LIGHTHOUSE #1
CAPE CANAVERAL AT CAPE CANAVERAL

 

     Since the theme for the next convention is “Lighting the Way for Friendship and Fun in 2021” and their logo is a Lighthouse, I decided to write about the many lighthouses around the State of Florida, there are some 50+ all around the perimeter.  I will be starting at Cape Canaveral heading south, around the Keys and back up the other side and, of course, there  are quite a few around the shoreline of the Panhandle.  Then jumping across the state from Pensacola Lighthouse to Amelia Island and down to Ponce de Leon Lighthouse ending in Daytona Beach.

     In the 1600’s Spanish explorer, Ponce de Leon gave the area the name of Caba de las Corrientes (Cape of Currents) which became Canaveral but was renamed Cape Kennedy after our President was assassinated in 1963.  Some people did not like the change.  In 1973 the name of Cape Canaveral was restored by an act of the Florida legislature.
 
     The first lighthouse was erected in 1848, 3 years after we became a State but prior to the Civil War.   The first lighthouse was too short and not bright enough, only 60 feet tall.  Boats couldn’t see the light until they were already wrecked on the Southeast Shoals.  In 1850 the lighthouse was shut down because of the warring Seminoles.  In 1868 a new lighthouse was built and was 151 feet tall which made it tall enough for mariners to see the light.  This new light stood for 26 years until erosion threatened it and it was moved to its present site where it remains today.
 
     In July of 1853, Captain Mills Burham was appointed the lighthouse keeper where he served for 33 years.  After his death in 1886, his wife Mary and his oldest daughter were the lighthouse keepers until sometime into the 20th century.   The lighthouse is now owned by the U.S. Air Force.   It is maintained by the Coast Guard, as all lighthouses are. 
 
     The Convention is just starting to roll along and is gaining momentum.  If you purchase your ribbons by May 31st, the price is $35.00 for the weekend.  Our registration chairman, Linda Reid, reminds you to make checks to “67th F S D C” and mail to 1062 Old Millpond Road, Melbourne, FL 32940.
 
     Excerpts from the above article are from “Florida’s Fabulous Lighthouses”.  This book can be purchased from Carol Douget, Chairman of this Convention.   It is one of the “money maker projects”.  Send inquires to her at
cldcpa@yahoo.com.

 

Judy Anderson

Publicity


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Judy Anderson

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